As the name suggests, we are an association, not a club, run by a group of volunteer parents/grandparents who are keen for all children in the Peel region, regardless of ability to play Soccer.

How are we different from a club?
Clubs generally enter teams in to the Football West competition, they pay player and team registration fees to FW who in return organize leagues, fixtures, Referee allocation and other competition logistics.

As an association the PJSA pays a per player registration fee to Football West, this covers insurance for players, access to coaches training and entry in to the end of season country week competition, the PJSA generally follows the Football West guidelines with a few adjustments to suit the local market.

As an association, all leagues, fixtures and a lot of the team construction is organized by the committee, we also organize the training, allocation and payment of Referees, added to that the PJSA is required to liase with 3 different city councils concerning ground hire, maintenance and kidsport applications.

Answers to a few commonly asked questions:

Why does the PJSA have caps on squad sizes?
A number of reasons, but most importantly, too many subs equate to less playing time, players learn far more being on the pitch than standing behind the coach.

What is country week?
During the first week of the October school holidays the Cockburn city Football club host country week on behalf of Football West, this is an opportunity for players from regional areas to display their Soccer talents on a big stage, over the years many PJSA players have gained selection in to state regional teams, travelling to competitions in Singapore, Indonesia and other countries, for those not selected they’ve still had an exciting 5 days playing against the best from Albany, Bunbury or Karratha. Country week is free for those selected.

Why do we spread our fixtures across 3 different venues?
Sure we could fit all 900+ players on centrally located Bortolo park over a Friday evening/ Saturday morning but the turf would soon become a sandpit by mid-winter, secondly Singleton and South Yunderup are a big part of the long term future of Soccer in the Peel region, both areas are expected to receive large increases in population over the next 25 years, there is strong competition between sports for recreation facilities, its important we keep a firm grip on the facilities available to us now.

And lastly, are we just about kids playing Soccer?
Absolutely NO, the PJSA committee are always mindfull that we have a social responsibility, its important young players have the opportunity to play in a safe, encouraging enviroment, we hope that their experience gained from playing in this competition will have a positive effect on their adult life.

The PJSA is also keen to support disability Soccer in the Peel region under the guidance of the Peel regional football council, hosting sessions at Bortolo park on Saturday mornings.